Difference between revisions of "Hitting"

109 bytes added ,  02:04, 7 June 2020
Added a reference to science. Source: look up "spanking", "slapping", or "corporal punishment" on Google Scholar and you'll find find many
(Look up the word "hit" in the dictionary. It will make no mention of authority. A strike, a blow, a hit--they are all synonyms. Rewriting the definitions of words to suit your agenda, or avoid offending others' agendas, is pretty dishonest and morally...)
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(Added a reference to science. Source: look up "spanking", "slapping", or "corporal punishment" on Google Scholar and you'll find find many)
Tags: Mobile edit Mobile web edit
 
Some people don't call [[corporal punishment]] by an authority figure (for example a [[slap]] on the hand, or a [[spanking]]) "hitting", because they don't want to equate the practice of corporal punishment with less socially acceptable forms of hurting others.
 
Other people, though, see a difference between corporal punishment and hitting, and don't see the contradiction when a parent gives a child a [[swat]] on the rear to remember him that there is "no hitting" in this house, despite it being hitting by definition, and scientific research shows that corporal punishment makes a person more likely to use violence on others. Even if a parent's infliction of pain is as ad-hoc, uncontrolled and short-tempered as a child's, it will still not be considered hitting by some people. This is an example of the theory of ''monopoly of violence'' where authority reserves to themselves the right to use force, and only then in a measured response, in concepts from "resisting arrest" up to the ultimate use being ''war''.
 
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